ACPE Research Network’s Incorporating Research Into CPE

There are several links on ACPE Research Network’s Incorporating Research Into CPE that are useful in developing research literacy curricula.

1) Model Practices for Teaching Research in Clinical Pastoral Education

Located on the ACPE Research Network website section entitled Incorporating Research Into CPE, Model Practices for Teaching Research in Clinical Pastoral Education has two parts. The first part summarizes Tartaglia et al.’s 2013 article reporting model practices for teaching research literacy from a survey of 11 CPE residency programs.

Tartaglia, A., Fitchett, G., Dodd-McCue, D., Murphy, P., & Derrickson, P. (2013). Teaching research in Clinical Pastoral Education: A survey of model practices. Journal of Pastoral Care and Counseling, 67(1), 1-15.

The second part contains links to syllabi for teaching research literacy from 4 CPE residency programs:

  • Virginia Commonwealth University (syllabi for each course in their 3 course sequence)
  • Rush University Medical Center (the 2013 version of the course reported above)
  • Advocate Lutheran General Hospital
  • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (an 8 session course taught by John Ehman, the ACPE Research Network convener).
2) Penn State Hershey Medical Center

There are several helpful resources for teaching research literacy in CPE developed by Paul Derrickson and colleagues at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Paul Derrickson, now retired, was the first Convener of the ACPE Research Network.

a) Getting to the Heart of Pastoral Care, Spirituality Research and Education: The Spiritual Pathway Project by Angelina VanHise and Paul Derrickson

The authors presented this 35-slide presentation at a workshop at the 2010 ACPE annual meeting. The Spiritual Pathway curriculum, developed by Susan Nance and her colleagues, is described as it existed at that time at Penn State Hershey. The presentation includes the titles of the projects completed by their residents between 2004 and 2010.

Derrickson and VanHise also published a paper about their curriculum:

Derrickson, P., & Van Hise, A. (2010). Curriculum for a spiritual pathway project: Integrating research methodology into pastoral care training. Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy, 16(1-2), 3-12.

Another approach to teaching research literacy in CPE by engaging students in developing spiritual care pathways is described by Susan Nance and her colleagues at Memorial Hermann Healthcare Systems. See below for a more detailed description.

Nance, M.S., Ramsey, K.E., & Leachman, J.A. (2009). Chaplaincy care pathways and clinical pastoral education. Journal of Pastoral Care & Counseling, 63(1-2), 11-1-4.

b) Three presentations created by Paul Derrickson for use in teaching CPE residents about research

The 14 slides in this presentation describe a rationale for chaplain research literacy and give an overview of the research literacy curriculum as it was taught at the time at Penn State Hershey.

There are 66 slides in this presentation. They cover three main areas:  1) Research basics, 2) an introduction to qualitative research, and 3) types of study designs in quantitative research.

The 22 slides in this presentation describe how chaplains can use research to engage questions that arise in clinical practice. They include links to helpful websites and texts.

3) Ways of Knowing: Possibilities for a Ministry Specialty Project

This is a 67-slide presentation by Steve Overall (CPE Supervisor), St Luke’s Hospital and Lucy Hood (Professor of Nursing), St Luke’s College, Kansas City, MO. The presentation describes some of the material covered in the St. Luke’s curriculum in which students complete a specialty project. More than half the presentation summarizes the main features of qualitative research. The presentation was shared at the ACPE Research Network meeting at the 2010 ACPE annual meeting. See also John Ehman’s table, Ways of Knowing. This one-page handout lists four ways of knowing (empiricism, rationalism, authority, and intuition/inspiration/revelation) as well as the strengths and weakness of each approach. Reviewing this sheet would be one way to help students reflect on how research complements other ways of knowing commonly used in spiritual care.

4) Twelve Guiding Questions for Incorporating Research into a CPE Curriculum

Written by John Ehman, this brief list of 12 questions is a helpful place to begin as you think about developing your research literacy curricula. The list is divided into 3 types of questions: curricular factors; resource factors; and student factors. The second question, “Are students expected to do research projects?” (and some of the answers to the other questions) are directed to centers where conducting research projects is required. In contrast, remember that our CPE Curriculum Development Grants focus on developing research literacy, not on doing a research project (see the FAQs elsewhere on the website).

Memorial Hermann Healthcare Systems: Chaplain Care Pathways

While it is not described on the ACPE Research Network website, we want to draw your attention to work by Susan Nance and her colleagues. As noted in the presentation by VanHise and Derrickson, (see above), Nance and colleagues (2009) also developed a chaplaincy care pathway curriculum for their CPE residents. As the authors write, the activity “involves reflection on chaplaincy experience with a particular patient population or family circumstance, research of current inter-disciplinary literature, and identification of identifiable and measurable intended results or desired outcomes of the chaplains’ ministry.” The article includes an example of a pathway for care for transplant patients and their families. We think developing spiritual care pathways can be a useful component in teaching research literacy to chaplains. It is one effective way to design a curriculum that is applicable to practice, the third criteria on which we evaluate curricula proposals that are submitted for the CPE Curriculum Development Grant.

Nance, M.S., Ramsey, K.E., & Leachman, J.A. (2009). Chaplaincy care pathways and clinical pastoral education. Journal of Pastoral Care & Counseling, 63(1-2), 11-1-4.